Father and Son

I do have some things on my mind to write about, but for today I’m going to copy my last post from the old blog.

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Yesterday’s math lesson turned into an extended life talk with Dad.  Mom went to Dad to seek help on finding out why James didn’t get as many addition facts solved as she thought he should and to see what Dad thought about how much was a reasonable amount and what we could do to help James.  After Dad went through a series of addition facts with James, he began to talk to him about discipline and the mind.  And they made lots of life applications to this basic necessary life skill.  James was so pumped the rest of the day.

I thought about what had happened and how blessed James was to have such a dad. And I thought about how so many men and women are “messed up” simply because they don’t have a parent who will spend time with them talking about things on a high level.  I’m not sure that James’ pumpitude through the remainder of the day was really about the exact thing they had discussed, but more about the fact that his Dad valued him enough to spend this time with him and to talk to him on such a high level.

James was having trouble going to sleep last night.  He came into our room and expressed concern about who would take care of him if something bad happened to us.  He says from time to time that he is amazed that, of all the parents in the world he could have been born to, that we would be the ones.  He is very grateful.  And I’m extremely grateful for him.

I love my husband and son very much.  I love my husband for his clear-mindedness and doing the right thing because it is the right thing.  I love him for having vision for the future and seeing the good and bad consequences of our every day choices and interactions.  I love that he is influenced by a drive for what is true.  I love that my son has such great values and wisdom at such a young age.  He also wants truth. And he takes nothing for granted.  He is a very grateful boy.

“Correct your son, and he will give you peace;
yes, he will bring delight to your soul.” ~Proverb 29:17

Dad and happy boy on the path

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6 Responses to Father and Son

  1. I have three sons and my husband does a lot of the talking and reasoning with them like your husband and son. I think this is such a valuable way to show with our words and actions that our boys are worth the time and effort, not just when they need to be disciplined but all the time. Positive attention and reinforcement means so much coming from dad!

    Thanks for sharing this with the CM Carnival.

  2. Erin says:

    Dad’s play such a pivotal role.

  3. Joy says:

    This is beautiful, Kay. What a wonderful thing to see such a tender heart in your son. I know it gives you much joy. I am happy to hear of such trust and love between a family.
    JoyH (via the carnival, but also from the CM Ning group0

  4. Jamie says:

    I could cry about this. We are realizing how DEEPLY important fathers are to a child. In our case, it’s especially evident in the daughter we adopted as a teen, and how deeply she has been hurt by not having a dad in her life until she came into our family. Your children are blessed!

  5. Kay Pelham says:

    I titled this “Father and Son” and related the incident with my husband and son, but mostly I wanted to share how important it is for a child to know they are valued by whatever or whichever parent that have. The most wonderful thing in the world is to have a father and a mother. I know that it doesn’t always work out that way for some folks. But if that one parent will really show that child that they value them — not by money, but by time — it will go a long way in making up for the absence of a second parent.

  6. amy in peru says:

    wow. me too, Jamie.

    SO important.

    SO special for the boy and his dad… for the girl and her dad too!

    Kay, your post inspires me to make more meaningful moments for my kids by taking advantage especially of the difficult moments to make a positive lasting impact (instead of the opposite!).

    amy in peru